Friday, January 28, 2011

Gourmet--To Be or Not To Be?




I've been working to put simpler meals on our table for awhile now.  That can be quite a challenge--not in the preparation, but in coming up with something that meets the delicious requirement as well.  Should I move on to more challenging menus?  For awhile?  Yes?  No?  

This two volume set of The Gourmet Cookbook has been sitting on the shelf for awhile.  They were a gift from a dear neighbor when we moved from Charleston, S.C.--over two decades ago.  I think one reason they've been shelved for so long is the fact that they are in the old Gourmet style.  The style of not separating the ingredients from the instructions.  Many times I didn't read closely enough and would get to a crucial point in a recipe and realize I didn't have an important ingredient.  Lately, they've been calling to me.  Do they want to be read?  Used?  Dusted?

 

Would you like a recipe for Woodchuck Stew?  Creamed Woodchuck?  Mutton Hash with Sausages?  Charlotte Russe?  Charlotte de Pommes?  English Roly-Poly Suet Pudding?  There's even Corn Bread For Northerners Only!!



Or, should I just stick with simple?

Have a great weekend!!

29 comments:

  1. Okay for someone who likes cookbooks as you do, this is my problem...and maybe it is just me because I am NOT a cook; that is my husband's territory, however I do like to bake!
    Anyway, when I open a cookbook looking for a recipe, I get so inundated with the prospects I end up just shucking it all and going back to something tried and true.

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  2. Anything containing woodchock or suet is definately not gourmet! I think these would be good for a laugh, though!! Stick to your own creations.

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  3. If you have that commercial running on TV in your neck of the woods, with the woodchucks chucking the farmer's stash of wood into the his pond... and him screaming from his tractor..."Hey You WOODCHUCKS!!! Quit Chucking My Wood!!!" I bet he would love that recipe for the stew...
    (you know, how much wood can a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood....say that fast 3 times)

    So... where would you purchase woodchuck meat? I would love to see you create that dish... yep.

    From a southerner's point of view... no such thing as Northern Cornbread. Okay, I will bite... What's the difference?

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  4. I have those cookbooks! And totally hate how the ingredients are blended in, eesh! Having said that, there are some really good recipes in there...we eat healthy but every now and then I dip into the sinful. Did you know that cornbread for Northerners has more sugar? Don't know why...have a great weekend!

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  5. I definitely don't wnat the soodchuck stew. I say these would be fun to read, but not cook with.
    But then I'm just a Westerner, what do I know!

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  6. WELL----I think I'll stay away from that cookbook... There are so many cookbooks out there --and for special chefs like you, I'm sure you can get great ideas from many of them.

    Since I'm not much of a cook, I'll definitely stick with SIMPLE... ha ha

    Hugs,
    Betsy

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  7. Don't use it ro read....but form funny moments!!!Hugs, Flavia



    I visited Charleston last summer....I loved it!!!! xoxoxoxo

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  8. Woodchuck stew???????? These books would be fascinating to read, but they sound a little too out there for my taste.

    I say stick with simple!

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  9. What a wonderful treasure trove of food history you have. Woodchuck stew? I think I'll pass on that one.

    I miss GOURMET! When Ruth was editor it was so with it and perfect.

    Sending love, (I planted rhubarb & artichokes today),

    Sharon Lovejoy Writes from Sunflower House and a Little Green Island

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  10. I had one of those types of Gourmet cook books from the eighties I think, and it was a special on Vienna. My boss gave it to me as a going away gift. All the recipes were just a bit too much, so I gave that one away.

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  11. So those cookbooks look so beautiful! I love older books...there is so much beauty in those bindings. But as to recipes? I always prefer simple when it comes to main dishes. But then again...I like challenging recipes when I'm baking. Thank you for sharing, sweetheart. I hope you have a happy Saturday. Hugs and love!

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  12. I've found now that I gravitate toward cookbooks with photos. I don't even want to imagine what creamed woodchuck looks like though. :)

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  13. I still use mine..they are classics! Why not mix things up? Bookmark some interesting recipes (no woodchuck) and make them once in a while.
    Not many photos though.....

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  14. I think you have to listen to your callings... try it! If you decide after a time or two you are craving simple, do simple. Mix it up. Give us a sample of something we might not come up with on our own. I dom't have those cookbooks. Let's see what's inside... doesn't mean we have to look inside forever. Lately, I'm on a big kick to see things with new eyes (hence the painting and interest in photography)... So, I'm game. I also LOVE simple. Whatever you do, I'll be reading about it!

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  15. Some of my best recipes are from old Gourmet cookbooks. They are treasures to have in your library even with the odd ones that you would never cook.

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  16. I vote northern cornbread, want to see how it differes from southern.

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  17. A few of the recipes you mentioned are worth rehashing :-). I love old cookbooks. I also trust that if you decide to revive any of those recipes you'll share your results with us. Have a wonderful weekend. Blessings...Mary

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  18. They are beautiful books. I like Barbara's idea. I'll bet there are some great recipes tucked in there amidst the woodchucks and mutton ;) How about semi-gourmet?

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  19. I think I would stick to simple! :D Carla

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  20. came by via scrambledhenfruit....

    and i LOVE those old Gourmet books....fun reading those recipes...let's see..i just added woodchcuck to my grocery list

    :-)

    happy to visit and happy to follow

    kary

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  21. hi bonnie...that is so funny about the woodchuck...off to place an order :-)

    kary
    xxx

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  22. I go through that dilemma regularly! I like a mix of both :) Woodchuck does not qualify as gourmet in my book, hah!!

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  23. Whoa those sound like some crazy recipes! I wouldn't even know where to FIND woodchuck...maybe best to stick with some of the less...unusual recipes.

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  24. I guess I would have to have the cornbread for Northerners :)

    I love to browse old cookbooks. There is a tiny shop in NYC that sells only vintage coobooks..I blogged about it once under the subject "Bonnie Slotnick Cookbooks"

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  25. Now I'm going to have to think upon the woodchuck stew! :)

    How exciting! My husband's line is Robert King Carter and he's buried in Christ's Church in Lancaster County, Virginia. We were at a Carter Society Reunion in September at Williamsburg! If you're interested in being a member just let me know. Our little grand daughter was named 'Carter' after this line! :)
    Thanks for popping in,
    Shelia ;)

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  26. You know I've eaten some weird things in my life but never a woodchuck....

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  27. Just on looks alone...I'd love having these books within my book shelf. Vibrant colors.

    I also remain as simplistic as possible in my daily kitchen...however, I don't mind the challenge from timt to time ;o)

    Claudia

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  28. The demise of Gourmet magazine was bad enough so please, I would love to see some of those old recipes revived. Maybe you could work in one a month. I have the magazines going back to the 1960's and every once in a while I try and post about what I've made. There are some gems in there amongst the woodchuck recipes. LOL.

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